Science

No, Science Can’t Provide Morals: Why the New View (Still) Falls Short

"...in addition to the traditional areas of scientific inquiry and expertise, such as chemistry, physics, and medicine, many now even look to science for guidance on moral questions—and many scientists and science boosters are eager to claim they can provide it." - TGC

365 reads

Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Humanity: An Interview with John C. Lennox

"AI has two meanings. The first is narrow AI—that is a system comprised of a powerful computer, a large data base, and a program that sorts desired patterns from that data base....The second kind of AI is Artificial General Intelligence (AGI)." - Bible Gateway

433 reads

Ideology is canceling science

"To be sure, science, being a human enterprise, has never been completely free of bias and personal agendas.  But the scientific method attempts to limit such subjectivity as much as possible.  But to, in effect, require positive bias–though in the name of combatting negative bias–strikes at the foundation of the scientific enterprise." - Veith

1607 reads

Darwin’s racism: How early evolutionary theory fueled discrimination

"Race-based discrimination has multiple sources, many of which preceded Darwin, but evolutionary theory gave 'a powerful push to a scientific version of racism that still impacts us today,' said John West, vice president and a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute." - WORLD

450 reads

The Limits of Science (Part 2)

By Brett Williams. Read Part 1.

Science and Certainty

With culture, the logical induction of the scientific method has won. Most believe that Bacon’s method, as refined for centuries, is the best way to speak to certainty. All other ways, such as faith and philosophy, speak to subjective or personal things, whereas science speaks to things as they are. Even when theology boldly speaks of understanding God and truth, it dares not do so with the same gravitas as one would speak of gravity. We know that gravity acceleration equals 9.8 meters per second squared; we believe that Jesus rose from the dead. One is certain and objective, the other only hope.

1380 reads

The Limits of Science (Part 1)

By Brett Williams

Several years ago, while on a lengthy flight to a conference, I found myself sitting next to a young neurobiologist. To some, a theologian and scientist on a plane may sound like the beginning of a poor joke. To me however, it was a fascinating confluence of contrary epistemologies (“studies of the method and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity”).

After polite pleasantries, she disclosed her reasoning for studying neuroscience: for many years, her mother had suffered from dementia and was nearing the end of her life. That passenger and I had an instant human connection the moment I shared that I had lost my grandmother to the same terrible disease. This connection produced a respectful and congenial conversation about neurology, synapses, the nature of the soul, and whether or not memory is mere physiological mechanics, mysterious metaphysics, or both. Eventually this debate expanded to whether or not science or faith is best suited to understand truth.

3716 reads

Pages