Religious Trends

Study: Slightly Fewer US adults say religious belief is matter of personal opinion . . . but it's still a majority

"The results show that while 60% of U.S. adults held the view that religious belief is a matter of personal opinion in 2018, that number dropped to 54% in 2020." - C.Post

267 reads

Biennial State of Theology survey: 30% of “evangelicals” believe Jesus isn’t God

"though the Bible and traditional teachings of the Christian Church hold that Jesus truly existed as both man and God, among the key findings of the biennial State of Theology survey from Ligonier Ministries conducted with LifeWay Research, is that 52% of American adults believe that Jesus was a great teacher and nothing more." - C.Post

930 reads

Survey: “a majority of people who describe themselves as Christian (52%) accept a ‘works-oriented’ means to God’s acceptance.”

"huge proportions of people associated with churches whose official doctrine says eternal salvation comes only from embracing Jesus Christ as savior believe that a person can qualify for Heaven by being or doing good. That includes close to half of all adults associated with Pentecostal (46%), mainline Protestant (44%), and evangelical (41%) churches. A much larger share of Catholics (70%) embrace that point of view." - AWVI 2020

383 reads

68% of American Adults Are Now ‘Bible Curious’

"According to American Bible Society’s (ABS) report, State of the Bible 2020, the number of American adults considered 'Scripture engaged' based on how frequently they read the Bible and its impact on their relationships and choices dropped from 28% to 23% ...Yet the study also shows 68% of American adults (about 172 million people) are ‘Bible curious,’.... More Americans were exploring the Bible for the first time in June 2020 compared to January 2020." - Bible Gateway

359 reads

The Old Gods or the New? A Review of Tara Isabella Burton’s “Strange Rites: New Religions for a Godless World”

"Strange Rites explores and analyzes seven different movements in contemporary modern American life, all of which function—at some level—as new faith systems after the decline of mainline Protestantism. The current age, for Burton, is decidedly not secular." - John Ehrett

628 reads

Pages