Peace

Fruit of the Spirit: “The life of a believer should be characterized by being at peace with those around us”

D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones: “Nowhere in this chapter is there an exhortation or an appeal to produce a unity. Our Lord is saying that the unity is already there, already in existence.” - Ref21

523 reads

When the Wicked Prosper: A Biblical Perspective

By Micah Colbert

What should we do when the wicked prosper?

Like most of you, I’m deeply concerned with a lot that’s taking place in our country. Godless ideologies are rapidly becoming mainstream as wicked people in powerful positions of influence relentlessly advance their agendas. Those who try to resist are marginalized or “cancelled.” The alarming success of the wicked cannot be ignored. It’s reshaping our culture, worldview, relationships, and freedoms. One can only imagine what might be on the horizon if the wicked continue to prosper in their endeavors.

So how should we as God’s people respond to all of this? Thankfully, we don’t have to figure out how to navigate through these challenging times on our own. God’s Word gives us answers. Below are a few thoughts from the Scriptures that I trust will be an encouragement to you:

Let the future hope of the gospel fuel your present pursuit of holiness

I can’t think of a greater book to turn to in troubling times than 1 Peter. This epistle was written to encourage believers who are being persecuted for their faith. In this book, Peter exhorts suffering saints to passionately pursue a life of holiness in light of the hope that we have in Christ (1 Peter 1:13-21).

1601 reads

“We’re made for peace—peace with ourselves, peace with one another, peace with God.”

"We’ve been surrounded by chaos, much of it intentionally designed; we’ve been told by people we trust that we need to be angry, agitated, active, desperate; that Those People are evil incarnate, and irremediably dangerous, and if we don’t stop them, It’s All Over." - Olinger

390 reads

The Peace of God

A sermon delivered on Sunday evening, January 6, 1878, by C. H. Spurgeon, at the Metropolitan Tabernacle, Newington.

“And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.”—Philippians 4:7.

1280 reads

How to Keep the Heart

A Sermon Delivered on Sunday Evening, February 21, 1858, by Pastor C. H. Spurgeon, at New Park Street Chapel, Southwark.

“The peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds, through Christ Jesus.”  Philippians 4:7

It is remarkable, that when we find an exhortation given to God’s people in one part of the Holy Scripture, we almost invariably find the very thing which they are exhorted to do guaranteed to them, and provided for them, in some other part of the same blessed volume. This morning, my text was, “Keep the heart with all diligence, for out of it are the issues of life.” Now, this evening we have the promise upon which we must rest, if we desire to fulfill the precept: —”The peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds, through Christ Jesus.”

This evening we shall use another figure, distinct from the one used in the morning, of the reservoir. We shall use the figure of a fortress, which is to be kept. And the promise saith that it shall be kept—kept by “the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, through Christ Jesus.”

1636 reads

Peace–How Gained, How Broken

Delivered By C.H. Spurgeon on Lord’s-Day Morning, October 27, 1889 at the Metropolitan Tabernacle, Newington.

“I will hear what God the Lord will speak: for He will speak peace unto His people and to His saints: but let them not turn again to folly.” Psalm 85:8.

“I WILL hear what God the Lord will speak.” There were voices and voices. There were voices of the past concerning God’s wondrous mercy to His people—”You have been favorable unto Your land; You have brought back the captivity of Jacob.” But mingled with these were the sad voices of the present. He heard the wailing and the pleading of those who said, “Will You be angry with us forever? Will You draw out Your anger to all generations?” From this mingling of singing and sighing, the Psalmist turned away and cried, “I will hear what God the Lord will speak. I will get me into the secret place of the tabernacles of the Most High. I will hear that voice from between the cherubim which speaks peace to the soul.”

Beloved, herein is wisdom. Resort to the sanctuary of God. When you cannot find harmony in the voices of the street, or the voices of the Church, turn to the melody of that one voice which “will speak peace unto His people.”

1403 reads

Pages