Meaning of Life

“An unprecedented loss of values and religion is leaving young Americans depressed, unhappy, and angry.”

"I began part one of 'Why Are So Many Young People Unhappy?' with data showing the apparently unprecedentedly high rate of unhappiness among young people in America....  I do believe that a loss of values and meaning are the two greatest sources of unhappiness." - Dennis Prager

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“Politics and grievance are the cheap substitutes for cultivating young minds when meaning and theology have left the building”

"Despair is what results, and it’s what I heard beneath my neighbor’s lament. Such despair and empty moral imperatives also are on display in global protests over climate change." - WORLD

320 reads

The Viewpoint of Ecclesiastes: Cynicism or Realism?

From Faith Pulpit, Winter 2012.

Qoheleth, the author of Ecclesiastes,1 looked at the various areas of life and concluded that everything was vanity.2 He started (1:2) and ended (12:8) his writing by stating, “vanity of vanities, all is vanity.” Is vanity, however, the theological message of Ecclesiastes? Or should it be understood in a more positive light? Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart, co-authors of How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth, take differing views: “[one of us] understands Ecclesiastes to be an expression of cynical wisdom, which serves as a kind of ‘foil’ regarding an outlook on life that should be avoided; [the other one of us] understands the book more positively, as an expression of how one should enjoy life under God in a world in which all die in the end.”3 So is Ecclesiastes a warning to us of the vanity of life outside of a relationship with God or a message of how one can enjoy life despite its vanity?

1352 reads

What Is the Gospel? The Power and Peril of Short Gospel Definitions

At some point during my tenure as a pastor at Grace Baptist, I decided I needed a succinct, memorable expression of the gospel—a phrase I could repeat frequently in a variety of contexts until members of the flock would recall it reflexively.

What I came up with is pretty much straight from 1 Corinthians 15:1-4: The gospel is the good news that Jesus Christ died for sinners and rose again.

Though I didn’t end up teaching it as well I’d intended, the statement did become an important tool in my own thinking. It eventually became reflexive for me, and that was instrumental in a sanctification project God was advancing in my own life.

It was instrumental in two ways: First, it increased my gospel awareness in general sermon preparation, personal Bible study, and random reflections on life and being human. Second, it revealed its own inadequacy. As my understanding of the gospel deepened and expanded, I came to see that my “gospel in a nutshell” statement was too small.

I’m keeping it, though—all the nutshell statements are too small!

Someone I respect said the gospel is simply, “Jesus saves.” I’ve also heard, “The gospel is the cross,” and, “It’s Christ, and Him crucified” (1 Cor. 2:2). In a way, the gospel can be boiled down to one word: “Christ”!

3774 reads

Life Has No Meaning? 9 in 10 Young People in the UK Believe That

"A recent poll in the United Kingdom revealed that 89%—nearly 9 in 10—of young people, aged 16 to 29, 'believe that their lives have no meaning or purpose.' This saddening statistic is explained with a corresponding statistic shared in the same article—only 1% of this age group identifies as belonging to the Church of England.... In England, such attendance is down to less than 5%." - AiG

283 reads

“Notwithstanding Aristotle’s reflections, it is a common view that the ultimate goal in life is in fact pleasure.”

"In The Doctor and the Soul Frankl described how many of his patients, looking for the meaning of their individual lives would end up in 'ethical nihilism' because they held that the goal of life was pleasure." - Acton

253 reads

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