Reformation

“Protestantism didn’t hold back science – it revolutionised its methods, its theoretical content and its social significance.”

"So says Australian scholar Peter Harrison of the University of Queensland, the author of The Bible, Protestantism, and the Rise of Natural Science (Cambridge University Press, 2001) and Science Without God?:  Rethinking the History of Scientific Naturalism (Oxford University Press, 2019)." - Gene Veith

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Theological Roots and Moral Fruits of Reformation

ETS meeting focuses on Reformation heritage

"The Heritage of the Reformation" was the theme at this year's annual meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, where Southern Baptists delivered nearly a third of the gathering's presentations and Trinity International University President David Dockery was elected president." BPNews

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Book Announcement - Forged From Reformation: How Dispensational Thought Advances the Reformed Legacy

Reasons for the Reformation

First page of the 1517 Basel printing of the Theses as a pamphlet

There was nothing remarkable about that day in October, 1517, when a Roman Catholic priest by the name of Martin Luther fastened his now famous ninety-five theses to the Castle Church door in Wittenburg, Germany. He certainly did not expect to ignite a religious revolution. As a loyal son of the established church, Luther merely wished to engage his university town in theological discussion about certain church doctrines that troubled him. His goal was to try to rein in some of the most grievous abuses of the Church by discussing them openly.

Little did he know that his theses would be copied, printed, and distributed across Europe within days. In the providence of God, Luther’s modest debate propositions ignited a fire that is still burning today. On this five-hundredth anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, it is fitting to remember how it all began, and more importantly, why.

There are some today who question the validity of this great schism with Rome. They believe that the Reformation, though probably warranted in its day, is no longer necessary. They assure us that the abuses of Luther’s day have been addressed, and it’s time to acknowledge the mistakes of the past and join hands as fellow members of Christ’s body.

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