Generations

Pew Research: Mainline Protestants twice as likely as evangelicals to have religiously unaffiliated teenage kids

"In a report released Thursday, Pew found that 80% of evangelicals surveyed had a teenage child who shared their religious identification; 81% of Catholic respondents reported the same. However, mainline Protestant respondents ... 55%." - C.Post

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Gen Z Is Changing Everything

Encouraging a new generation to go on for God

A new generation is emerging right before our eyes. The Millennials are now adults, and today’s current youth culture is dominated by members of Generation Z. Everyone from professional marketeers to church leaders are beginning to realize that things are changing dramatically.

Research abounds about the characteristics and motivations of Generation Z. Most sociologists and demographers agree that this generational cohort, born between 1995 and 2010 and which now constitutes over 25 percent of the US population, is about to have a significant and lasting impact. That’s why James Emery White makes this recommendation, “Drop everything and start paying attention to Generation Z. They will not simply influence American culture… . They will constitute American culture.”

Based upon my own personal reading, research, and observations, here are some defining features of this new generation.

Gen Zs are “digital natives.”

This generation has always had constant access to the internet in their pockets or purses. I’ve seen two-year-olds with their own iPads, and five-year-olds with their own smartphones. I’ll add to this later, but as Seemiller and Grace have suggested, the members of Gen Z are most likely the offspring of Gen Xers. Gen Xers were the first generation to use their PCs or Macs for work, and they are the first generation to be totally comfortable with their children utilizing various devices for continual connection to the internet.

2617 reads

3 Common Traits of Youth Who Don’t Leave the Church

"'What do we do about our kids?' The group of parents sat together in my office, wiping their eyes....they weren’t talking about 16-year-olds drinking and partying. They were talking about youth church attendance. Each had a story to tell about a 'good Christian' child, raised in their home and in our church, who had walked away from the faith during the college years." - Church Leaders

657 reads

“Young adults want authenticity, which is why, according to a recent poll, 67% of millennials said they’d prefer a ‘classic’ church over a ‘trendy’ one.”

"Traditional churches tend to hold onto their attendance numbers better than most. Young adults in search of a moral foundation want theological consistency, and they’re drifting toward churches that can offer both." - Washington Examiner

787 reads

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