Evangelicals

Gene Veith on why some people don't like evangelicals

"What most bothers the public about evangelicals is that they are 'too pushy with their beliefs.'  That is, people don’t like being witnessed to.  That evangelicals care about non-Christians’ temporal problems, for which Jesus can help them,  and their eternal destiny, for which Jesus offers free salvation, does not matter." - Gene Veith

317 reads

David French explains how Pete Buttigieg's Mainline Protestant faith differs from evangelical faith

"...the Mainline vision of salvation is alien to the Evangelical mind. Without diving in depth into each of the 'Five Solas' of the Reformation, most Evangelical Protestants understand salvation not through works of compassion but rather through faith alone, by the grace of God alone, working through the atoning sacrifice of Christ alone." - The Dispatch

265 reads

National Association of Evangelicals’ New President Hopes to Bring Together a Movement in Crisis

"Anderson and others have tried to keep the movement’s name from being hijacked as merely a political marker....Now Kim takes on these challenges, which have intensified during Donald Trump’s presidency. Christians are increasingly and explicitly asking what it means to be an evangelical today, with recent releases like Who Is an Evangelical? and Still Evangelical?" - Christianity Today

406 reads

Review: "The Evangelicals" by Frances Fitzgerald

Frances Fitzgerald is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist with a B.A. in Middle Eastern history. She has written numerous books. In 2018, she published The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America (730 pgs). This book is particularly interesting for several reasons. First, Fitzgerald is a responsible journalist and historian. Second, she does not appear to be an evangelical insider, which means she may have a more objective viewpoint. Third, the issue of the “Christian right” has become very, very relevant since Donald Trump’s election as President of the United States in 2016.

So, I picked the book up at my local library. Fitzgerald explains:1

this book is not a taxonomy or attempt to describe the entirety of evangelical life, but rather a history of the white evangelical movements necessary to understand the Christian right and its evangelical opponents that have emerged in recent years.

Fitzgerald begins with the first Great Awakening and moves rapidly through the American religious scene until arriving at Jerry Falwell and the Moral Majority by page 291. The remainder of the book (340 pages of text) chronicles the Christian Right over the past 40 years.

1316 reads

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