Bible Versions

The Well and the Water: An Allegory

In The Nick of Time Once upon a time, a band of vigorous tribesmen occupied a high and arid plain. They were surrounded by snow-covered peaks, and what little water they had trickled down from the glaciers and snowfields above. Water was precious to them, for their lives depended upon it. They took care not to waste a drop.

One day, a mighty man rose up among them and asked, “Why do we wait for such water as the mountains are willing to share? Why do we not dig a well?” So he began to dig. But there were in that land certain men who had been given authority to distribute the water. These men knew that if people could drink at will, then their power would end. And so these Authorities sought to defeat the well digger. When the well digger died, they stopped up his well and resumed their authority.

In spite of the Authorities, however, water continued to seep from the well digger’s well. Eventually, other mighty well diggers arose. The Authorities killed some of these. They stopped up the wells of others. But with each new well, the Authorities grew weaker. Soon many wells dotted the plain. People were at last able to drink freely, to water their herds and flocks, and to grow their crops. The Authorities lapsed into oblivion, for water was free to all.

After these things, a new king began to reign. He hired the best well diggers to dig a deep well. “This well,” he proclaimed, “is the Authorized Well. Let all drink freely from it!”

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The KJVO Debate in Light of “The Translators to the Reader,” Part 2

Author’s Note: I have provided page numbers for quotations using The Holy Bible: King James Version (1611 Edition. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers, n.d.). From the title page: “a word-for-word reprint of the First Edition of the Authorized Version presented in roman [sic] letters for easy reading and comparison with subsequent editions.” I have updated some words with modernized spelling and inserted my own explanatory notes in brackets, however.

See Part 1.

This is the final installment of a two-part article on the relevance of the KJV Preface for issues raised by some King James Version Only (KJVO) advocates. [1] The idea of an inspired or perfect Bible translation, the propriety of a translation in modern English, and the concerns about marginal notes were addressed in part 1. This article examines four more issues Bibleraised by KJVO proponents that are addressed in the KJV Preface, written by translator Miles Smith. [2]

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The KJVO Debate in Light of “The Translators to the Reader,” Part 1

Author’s Note: I have provided page numbers for quotations using The Holy Bible: King James Version (1611 Edition. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers, n.d.). From the title page: “a word-for-word reprint of the First Edition of the Authorized Version presented in roman [sic] letters for easy reading and comparison with subsequent editions.” I have updated some words with modernized spelling and inserted my own explanatory notes in brackets, however.

Many of us have been exposed to or embroiled in debates relating to the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. Is it the only legitimate English translation? Should it be revised? Was it really good enough for Paul? The list goes on. The point of this article is to consider some issues raised by proponents of some form of the King James Version Only (KJVO) position 859675_book.jpgand how those issues were addressed by the translators of the KJV in their preface. [1] The listing below should not be taken as an accusation that all KJVO advocates hold to all of these ideas, but they are ideas that have been advanced by various advocates of a KJVO position.

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Translation Change Best for Us

For some time, I have believed we needed to make a change in the translation that we use at Red Rocks Baptist Church as well as what we use at Silver State Christian School. But I have been in ministry long enough to know that “change,” regardless of how small it may seem to leadership, can impact church members in a big way. Over the years, I have made a16111.jpg number of changes in our church, not in core beliefs but in the area of methodology and practical ministry. We have rewritten our constitution, moved our facilities (twice), changed our worship service format and times, changed our name, utilized technology in our worship services, restructured our outreach program, reformatted our Sunday school and children’s ministries, developed our music policy, and refined our membership materials and process.

From my experience, at least four essential ingredients make change happen “decently and in order.”

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Steel on Steel in Coeur d’ Alene

Note: This is a summary article, condensing 15 pages of notes, of the Steeling the Mind Bible Conference in the enchanting lake city of Coeur d’ Alene, Idaho, on October 21, 2006.

Conservative evangelicals can intersect with professing Christian fundamentalists at various points. Years ago, Chuck Missler thought there ought to be an annual conference developed with the name, “Surviving the 90’s.” But Bill Perkins’s wife, thinking of Proverbs 27:17, thought of a conference name more captivating and enduring, “Steeling the Mind.” Because all the sessions are cram-packed into one day, any conference attendee probably wishes he possessed a fresh, steel mind to carry him through 12-plus hours of Bible concentration. Frankly, we need more of this among God’s people with an even greater and more passionate intellectual gaze upon God. I feel like a mushy Idaho spud in the shadow of what I have read concerning the content shared in past Bible conferences offered for the layman and pastor alike.

The Press (Oct. 21, 2006), a local newspaper, reported, “Bill Perkins is about to pull off what to many might seem nothing short of a miracle. He’s going to bring 1,000 people together all day to study the Bible. And they’re even going to pay him $59 each to do it. ‘There’s not a lot of fluff,’ Perkins said, ‘We bring in the top speakers from the U.S. and let it rip. We deal with some subjects that are difficult.’”

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