C.S. Lewis

Review: If I Had Lunch with C. S. Lewis

A review of If I Had Lunch with C. S. Lewis: Explaining the Ideas of C. S. Lewis on the Meaning of Life,* by Alister McGrath, Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House, 2014, 241 pages, hdbk.

C. S. Lewis is an endlessly fascinating person. He was an Oxford Don with few equals as an intellectual. Anyone who is familiar with the three volumes of Letters is well aware that they are reading the correspondence of a man who had read (and often reread) just about every great work of literature in the Western canon. Lewis was a Medievalist, thoroughly at home in Thomas Aquinas, Dante and Boccaccio (in their originals), with Beowulf and the Nordic mythology, and with Edmund Spenser, Milton, and a whole roster of other poets and mystics and playwrights.

But Lewis not only knew the greats of the 10th to the 16th centuries, he was also immersed in Plato and Aristotle, the Tragedies, Virgil and Ovid, and Neo-Platonists, again, all in the original Greek and Latin. His Letters especially brim with references and allusions to these works as well as a host of British, French and German classics. He was, by any measure, a brilliant scholar.

But to say this about Lewis is not to get at the whole man. For C. S. Lewis was a man of down-to-earth uncommon sense. His faculties were aware of the limitations of the five senses and the realities of life and truth that dwelt beyond. He, like G. K. Chesterton, saw the miraculous everywhere.

1530 reads

“...we can be faithful in the moment, even when we don’t know the future, the outcome, our success or failure or even how to gauge those things”

Reflections on our times and C.S. Lewis' “Learning in Wartime.” ..."The death of our illusions, then, isn’t meant to paralyze us but to re-shape us into the people who know how to weep and how to groan and how to point to a different sort of kingdom. As he said: 'If we looked for something that would turn the present world from a place of pilgrimage into a permanent city satisfying the soul of man, we are disillusioned, and not a moment too soon.'" - Russel Moore

205 reads

Updated: Michael D. Aeschliman’s 1983 book, “The Restoration of Man: C. S. Lewis and the Continuing Case against Scientism”

"There is a double surprise in store for Aeschliman’s readers. It is alarming to learn how the rise and growth of a scientific culture has been linked with the most blatant subjectivism. It is a joy to be introduced to the 'great central tradition' of witnesses to the true meaning of words and defenders of human reason." - National Review

604 reads

C.S. Lewis on how the humanitarian theory of punishment threatens liberty

"[A]s C.S. Lewis argues in this essay, the humanitarian theory of punishment deprives a person of the 'rights of a human being.' And when deterrence is the sole goal of the system then even the punishment of the innocent is warranted since it can have a deterrent effect." - Acton

405 reads

Former Atheist Explains How Rationality, Not Emotion, Encourages Religious Belief

"Today’s atheists insist that religion and Christianity are necessary because they provide the emotional crutch for difficult times. But Lewis’ journey provides a different picture. Who do you think is right?" - Intellectual Takeout

513 reads

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