Missions

Missions: Don’t Go Until You’re Sent

The greatest challenge to modern missions is a lack of understanding of the church’s nature and its role in missions.

The church in Antioch didn’t send the youngest (and thus cheapest to support), the least experienced in ministry, the most awkward, or those they wanted to get rid of. They sent Paul and Barnabas! They sent their best, the two men who were undoubtedly the congregation’s strongest leaders.

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The Barnabas Chronicle, Winter 2016-2017

Dear Family/Friends,

Happy New Year from Joel and Toni Tetreau. The Barnabas Chronicle is our attempt to communicate the latest happenings from our family, Southeast Valley Bible Church and IBL West (Institute of Biblical Leadership). What a year 2016 was. For our family the year was monumental. Jonathan (our eldest son) not only finished his Bachelor’s degree at ASU, but he married his sweetheart Brittany. Jeremy (our middle son) is now a junior and is enjoying his studies at Liberty University in Lynchburg. Joshua (our youngest son) lives at home and is studying education at ASU. All three of our sons continue to be very involved in the Lord’s work for which we are thankful.

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Contextualization in Missions Today

From Faith Pulpit, Summer 2016. Used by permission.

The very mention of the word “contextualization” in evangelical circles has engendered a variety of reactions. For some, contextualization is absolutely indispensable in cross-cultural ministry. For others, it is a word fraught with compromise that diminishes the purity and clarity of the gospel message. What accounts for these two opposite reactions? In this edition of the Faith Pulpit, Professor Mark Lounsbrough, chair of the Missions and Evangelism Department at Faith Baptist Bible College, examines the issue and gives clarity in this important debate.

By definition contextualization is putting a word, a thought, or a concept in its proper context. That concept seems innocent enough, so why do some object to its use? Part of the reason for the objection is that the word was popularized in an ecumenical context and so broadly applied that essential elements of the gospel were altered or omitted for the sake of making the message of Jesus more palatable to unwelcoming people groups.

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