Evangelism

Atheism is declining, says report; what should Christians do?

"According to the [Center for the Study of Global Christianity] report, atheism reached its peak in 1970, with over 165 million atheists worldwide. Since then, atheism has been steadily decreasing, with 138 million today, a number that’s expected to drop to 129 million by 2050." - Christian Post

432 reads

Review: The End of White Christian America

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Robert P. Jones wrote his book in 2016. He’s the founder of the Public Religion Research Institute, and holds a PhD in religion from Emory and an MDiv from Southwestern. He’s a clever and engaging writer, and opens with an obituary for “White Christian America” (“WCA”). In this “eulogy,” he explained that WCA had been ill for some time, but the disease became terminal after the 2004 presidential election:1

The cause of death was determined to be a combination of environmental and internal factors—complications stemming from major demographic changes in the country, along with religious disaffiliation as many of its younger members began to doubt WCA’s continued relevance in a shifting cultural environment.

Jones writes from a progressive Christian perspective, and he sheds few tears at the death of WCA. His thesis is that a particular cultural era has ended in America; an era largely shaped and defined by WCA.2

What is WCA?

This is the million-dollar question, but (for me, at least) the biggest initial stumbling-block is that Jones decided to use a framework that generalizes Christians of various theological stripes by the color of their skin.3 It’s these white Protestants, Jones argues, who have lost their grip on the culture and are fast fading into obscurity.

3537 reads

San Diego: Victim of a “workplace Bible pest” is awarded a large payout

"In his complaint, Johnson alleged Beale began leading 'prayer sessions' in her new role as Deputy Director and urged her employees to attend church. During a subsequent performance review, Beale allegedly cautioned Johnson that he should start reading his Bible" - Patheos

520 reads

“Now, all you have to do is…” – The 7 Most Dangerous Words in Evangelism

"...while the phrase, 'Now, all you have to do is…' aims to highlight the vital truth that redemption is complete in Christ, I believe it actually serves as an unhelpful—and, at times, even dangerous—Christian catchphrase." - Facts & Trends

542 reads

“If One Believes Salvation Is Only Available Through One’s Own Faith, How Do You Deal with People of Other Faiths?”

"All these horrific conflicts were rooted not in religion but in religious intolerance. They involved, in many cases, the aggressors ignoring the principles of love, tolerance or respect inherent in their own religious scriptures." - RNS

657 reads

Plain Christianity

J. B. Phillips is perhaps best known for his translation of the New Testament, which was released piecemeal throughout the late 1940s and into the mid-1950s. He was an Anglican clergyman for over twenty years. Sometime in the early 1950s, Phillips gave a series of evangelistic talks for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. In 1954, these talks were compiled and published as a little book entitled Plain Christianity. The book is a warm-hearted, commonsense discussion about the Christian faith and message. With its mid-20th century British cadence, the book reminds the reader of C.S. Lewis’ Mere Christianity, which was also derived from a series of radio talks.

In this excerpt,1 Phillips discusses whether people can live without God.

There is a question which I think is in a good many people’s minds, though they may not often put it into words, and I am going to try to answer it. The question is simply this: ‘Can I live without God?’

1454 reads

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