FBFI

The New Perspective on Paul: "What Saint Paul Really Said"?

Rembrandt. The Apostle Paul. c. 1657. This article appears in the July/August 2006 issue of Frontline Magazine. It appears here with permission of the publisher.

By Albin Huss Jr.

The traditional Reformation understanding of the Pauline doctrine of justification has come under attack recently. Surprisingly, the chief assault has not come from Catholic or liberal Protestant theologians but from mainstream Evangelical theologians through an increasingly popular position known as the “New Perspective on Paul” (NPP).(1) Not only does this distinct theological perspective challenge the orthodox view of justification by faith, but it categorically rejects the traditional understanding that first-century Judaism was a works-based religion. In effect, the NPP charges that the Reformers, especially Luther, were so prejudiced by their own struggles with Catholicism that they falsely caricatured Judaism and, in so doing, misread Paul. Thus, NPP advocates have taken it upon themselves to tell us What Saint Paul Really Said.(2) Herein, we will critically examine this “new and informed” reading of Paul to determine whether it is accurate or aberrant.

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Concerning the New Perspective on Paul: FBFI Resolution 06-02

FBFI 2006 Annual ConferenceNOTE: The following standing resolution was presented at the 86th Annual Fellowship of the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship International on June 13, 2006, at Hamilton Square Baptist Church in San Francisco, California.

The New Perspective on Paul (NPP), fathered by E. P. Sanders, developed by James D. G. Dunn, and popularized by N. T. Wright, is not only erroneous exegetically, but more importantly is heretical theologically as a nonevangelical understanding of the apostle Paul and the soteriological teachings of the New Testament.

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Concerning the Internet and Blogs: FBFI Resolution 06-01

FBFI 2006 Annual ConferenceNOTE: The following standing resolution was presented at the 86th Annual Fellowship of the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship International on June 13, 2006, at Hamilton Square Baptist Church in San Francisco, California.

The FBFI realizes the great tool for ministry and discipleship the Internet can be, and we encourage those that do advance this tool to do so with New Testament principles in mind.

Use it wisely, considering the temptations and shipwreck that can be made through unfiltered and unaccountable Internet use.

Use it personally, avoiding the anonymity that often abandons the decorum that is Biblically appropriate between real people—such things as respect for age and elders, discretion with minors and children, consideration of position and wisdom.

Use it with restraint, avoiding the “knee-jerk” reactions and unbridled speech that commonly accompany private discussion. Remember that the whole world can see what is being written.

Use it with conviction, taking a stand for the things that are true and right and avoiding softness toward worldliness and compromise.

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