American Culture

The Age of Pelagius

"For decades now our politics and culture have been dominated by a particular philosophy of freedom. It is a philosophy of liberation from family and tradition, of escape from God and community... a philosophy that has defined our age, though it is far from new. In fact, its most influential proponent lived 1,700 years ago: a British monk who eventually settled in Rome named Pelagius." - Christianity Today

452 reads

“American adults spend an average of 11 hours, or almost half of each day, consuming some form of media.”

"With so much of our lives revolving around media consumption, it behooves us to develop what Tony Reinke, in his new book Competing Spectacles: Treasuring Christ in the Media Age, calls 'a theology of visual culture.'" - Christianity Today

210 reads

The Surprising Enemy of the Modern Church: Distraction

“At the dawn of the attention industries, then, religion was still, in a very real sense, the incumbent operation, the only large-scale human endeavor designed to capture attention and use it. But over the twentieth century, organized religion, which had weathered the doubts raised by the Enlightenment, would prove vulnerable to other claims on and uses for attention.” - Facts & Trends

292 reads

What Biblical Command Do Americans Consider the Most Important?

"As part of the American Bible Society and Barna Research’s State of the Bible 2019, respondents were given five prominent biblical commands and asked which one was the most important. 

Out of the options, American Bible users were most likely to choose 'do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with God,' taken from Micah 6:8." - Facts & Trends

277 reads

Liberalism: The Great Anti-Tradition

"The liberal person is an autonomous self whose ultimate goal is liberation from every idea and restraint except for the idea that restraint is unacceptable. Mitchell writes that the first stage of liberalism still relied on the Christian, traditional society in which it lived. But the second stage of liberalism, which he defines as beginning in the late 18th century, threw off even these restraints." - TAC

284 reads

Gallup: Half of Americans are church members, down from 70% in 1999

"This article compares church membership data for the 1998-2000 and 2016-2018 periods, using combined data from multiple years to facilitate subgroup analysis. On average, 69% of U.S. adults were members of a church in 1998-2000, compared with 52% in 2016-2018." - Gallup

345 reads

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