American Culture

Pew: In U.S., Decline of Christianity Continues at Rapid Pace

"65% of American adults describe themselves as Christians when asked about their religion, down 12 percentage points over the past decade. Meanwhile, the religiously unaffiliated share of the population, consisting of people who describe their religious identity as atheist, agnostic or 'nothing in particular,' now stands at 26%, up from 17% in 2009." - Pew

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Focus on the Family's Tim Goeglein Talks About “American Restoration”

"Goeglein says his time in Washington hasn’t made him cynical. In fact, as you’ll hear, it’s made him hopeful. But it’s a hope underpinned by the hope of the Gospel, and a belief that Christians can and will engage the current culture and not flee from it. These are ideas he explains in his new book “American Restoration:  How Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice Can Heal Our Nation.” - BreakPoint

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Review: The End of White Christian America

Image of The End of White Christian America
by Robert P. Jones
Simon & Schuster 2016
Kindle Edition 337

Robert P. Jones wrote his book in 2016. He’s the founder of the Public Religion Research Institute, and holds a PhD in religion from Emory and an MDiv from Southwestern. He’s a clever and engaging writer, and opens with an obituary for “White Christian America” (“WCA”). In this “eulogy,” he explained that WCA had been ill for some time, but the disease became terminal after the 2004 presidential election:1

The cause of death was determined to be a combination of environmental and internal factors—complications stemming from major demographic changes in the country, along with religious disaffiliation as many of its younger members began to doubt WCA’s continued relevance in a shifting cultural environment.

Jones writes from a progressive Christian perspective, and he sheds few tears at the death of WCA. His thesis is that a particular cultural era has ended in America; an era largely shaped and defined by WCA.2

What is WCA?

This is the million-dollar question, but (for me, at least) the biggest initial stumbling-block is that Jones decided to use a framework that generalizes Christians of various theological stripes by the color of their skin.3 It’s these white Protestants, Jones argues, who have lost their grip on the culture and are fast fading into obscurity.

1420 reads

An Obituary for White Christian America

Image of The End of White Christian America
by Robert P. Jones
Simon & Schuster
Kindle Edition

The following excerpt is from Robert P. Jones’ book The End of White Christian America.1 He wrote the book in 2016. Jones is the founder of the Public Religion Research Institute, and holds a PhD in religion from Emory and an MDiv from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

After a long life spanning nearly two hundred and forty years, White Christian America—a prominent cultural force in the nation’s history—has died.

WCA first began to exhibit troubling symptoms in the 1960s when white mainline Protestant denominations began to shrink, but showed signs of rallying with the rise of the Christian Right in the 1980s. Following the 2004 presidential election, however, it became clear that WCA’s powers were failing. Although examiners have not been able to pinpoint the exact time of death, the best evidence suggests that WCA finally succumbed in the latter part of the first decade of the twenty-first century. The cause of death was determined to be a combination of environmental and internal factors—complications stemming from major demographic changes in the country, along with religious disaffiliation as many of its younger members began to doubt WCA’s continued relevance in a shifting cultural environment.

1117 reads

“Are twentysomethings really such a ‘lost generation?’ Clydesdale and Graces-Foley give us reasons to be much more hopeful”

"The Twentysomething Soul widens the scope of this discussion with the authors’ original research, which draws from hundreds of interviews and thousands of surveys of twentysomethings across the nation. ...Clydesdale and Garces-Foley distill their work into seven major claims." - Christianity Today

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