Book Review

Review of ‘The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview Catalog’ by James Sire

"I first read The Universe Next Door as an undergraduate and new convert in 1977. The book was published in 1976 and was used in an alternative education class at the University of Oregon. I had been reading Francis Schaeffer (1912–1984) and was learning to think philosophically about my newfound faith....That word 'worldview' would change my life and the lives of countless others in the 1970s, and we largely have Sire to thank for that." - TGC

205 reads

You May Not Know Judaism as Well as You Think - Review of Separated Siblings: An Evangelical Understanding of Jews and Judaism

"Phelan, a retired theology professor and one-time president of North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago, has provided Christians with one of the most engaging and comprehensive guides to Jewish thought and civilization in the last half-century." - C.Today

245 reads

Review of Krom's Justice and Charity: An Introduction to Aquinas’s Moral, Economic, and Political Thought

"The reader will learn much to his or her benefit about Aquinas from Krom. Still, I left the book not wholly convinced that a moral, economic, and political philosophy and theology of the virtues can do the work he hopes it can—that of providing practical guidance in and engaging with a confused world." - Public Discourse

222 reads

Review: 40 Questions About Biblical Theology

A Review of 40 Questions about Biblical Theology* by Jason S. DeRouchie, Oren R. Martin, and Andrew David Naselli, Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2020, 400 pages, paperback.

How does one review a well-written and well researched book on Biblical Studies that one disagrees with almost entirely? That is the position I find myself in with this book. DeRouchie, Martin, and Naselli are all subscribers to the fast-spreading approach to the Bible called “Progressive Covenantalism,” an approach first annunciated for most people by Peter Gentry and Stephen Wellum’s Kingdom through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants, which I reviewed here.

What this means is that fans of New Covenant Theology are going to really like this book, fans of Covenant Theology are going to approve of much in it (even though CT draws some criticisms), “Essentialist” (to use Joseph Parle’s word) and Progressive Dispensationalists are going to like it a lot less, and “Biblical Covenantalists” (that’s me) are going to really take issue with it. I say this so that my biases will be clear.

1415 reads

Solzhenitsyn: Prophet to America - A review of Solzhenitsyn and American Culture: The Russian Soul in the West

"By way of an introduction to the Gulag Archipelago, readers would profit from reading Daniel J. Mahoney’s essay titled 'Judging Communism and All Its Works' in the Solzhenitsyn and American Culture collection." - Acton

968 reads

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