What Do You Believe About Ezekiel's Dry Bones Vision? Please choose an option closest to your view & explain caveats

It only predicts the revival and regeneration of end time Israel
67% (8 votes)
It only predicts the resurrection of the believer
0% (0 votes)
It predicts both the establishment of end time Israel and the resurrection of the believer
17% (2 votes)
It is general and merely demonstrates God's power to wrap up history
0% (0 votes)
It predicts the church age
8% (1 vote)
It predicts the current state of Israel (bones) awaiting regeneration
0% (0 votes)
Other or none of the above
8% (1 vote)
Total votes: 12
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There are 7 Comments

Jay's picture

Quote:
The Valley of Dry Bones

37:1 The hand of the Lord was upon me, and he brought me out in the Spirit of the Lord and set me down in the middle of the valley; it was full of bones. 2 And he led me around among them, and behold, there were very many on the surface of the valley, and behold, they were very dry. 3 And he said to me, “Son of man, can these bones live?” And I answered, “O Lord God, you know.” 4 Then he said to me, “Prophesy over these bones, and say to them, O dry bones, hear the word of the Lord. 5 Thus says the Lord God to these bones: Behold, I will cause breath to enter you, and you shall live. 6 And I will lay sinews upon you, and will cause flesh to come upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath in you, and you shall live, and you shall know that I am the Lord.”

7 So I prophesied as I was commanded. And as I prophesied, there was a sound, and behold, a rattling, and the bones came together, bone to its bone. 8 And I looked, and behold, there were sinews on them, and flesh had come upon them, and skin had covered them. But there was no breath in them. 9 Then he said to me, “Prophesy to the breath; prophesy, son of man, and say to the breath, Thus says the Lord God: Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe on these slain, that they may live.” 10 So I prophesied as he commanded me, and the breath came into them, and they lived and stood on their feet, an exceedingly great army.

11 Then he said to me, “Son of man, these bones are the whole house of Israel. Behold, they say, ‘Our bones are dried up, and our hope is lost; we are indeed cut off.’ 12 Therefore prophesy, and say to them, Thus says the Lord God: Behold, I will open your graves and raise you from your graves, O my people. And I will bring you into the land of Israel. 13 And you shall know that I am the Lord, when I open your graves, and raise you from your graves, O my people. 14 And I will put my Spirit within you, and you shall live, and I will place you in your own land. Then you shall know that I am the Lord; I have spoken, and I will do it, declares the Lord.”

I don't see how anyone can make this point to the NT resurrection of believers without pulling it astray.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Matthew J's picture

I believe the context implies God's dealing with Israel, as the broader context of Ezekiel has little to do with the NT, however, I believe that there isa clear principle here of God making what is dead alive again. I think this could also be applied in spiritual regeneration of salvation. Unless God's Spirit (breath) breathes upon a person, they are yet dead in their sins. But when God's spirit revives a person, they are alive unto God. So I see it as double, mostly about Israel's regeneration and restoration, but also about God's power and delight in general in making dead men live again spiritually.

Ed Vasicek's picture

Jay C wrote:
Quote:
The Valley of Dry Bones
11 Then he said to me, “Son of man, these bones are the whole house of Israel. Behold, they say, ‘Our bones are dried up, and our hope is lost; we are indeed cut off.’ 12 Therefore prophesy, and say to them, Thus says the Lord God: Behold, I will open your graves and raise you from your graves, O my people. And I will bring you into the land of Israel. 13 And you shall know that I am the Lord, when I open your graves, and raise you from your graves, O my people. 14 And I will put my Spirit within you, and you shall live, and I will place you in your own land. Then you shall know that I am the Lord; I have spoken, and I will do it, declares the Lord.”

I don't see how anyone can make this point to the NT resurrection of believers without pulling it astray.

I see both. The primary teaching is about Israel, but I believe Jesus teaches a midrash from passage in John 5:28-29:

Quote:
"Do not be amazed at this, for a time is coming when all who are in their graves will hear his voice and come out—those who have done good will rise to live, and those who have done evil will rise to be condemned.

There are actually two "bone" illustrations; one is of bones scattered, the other of graves opening. Although the primary teaching is that God will revive Israel, there might be a double-meaning. I say "might," so I am not saying this is certain. At bare minimum, Jesus is alluding to the same imagery.

"The Midrash Detective"

Jerry Shugart's picture

The regeneration of the "nation" of Israel which we see in the 37th chapter of Ezekiel is a "type" and the "antitype" is the spiritual regeneration of the "individual" believer. In that chapter we read:

"So I prophesied as I was commanded: and as I prophesied, there was a noise, and behold a shaking, and the bones came together, bone to his bone. And when I beheld, lo, the sinews and the flesh came up upon them, and the skin covered them above: but there was no breath in them. Then said he unto me, Prophesy unto the wind, prophesy, son of man, and say to the wind, Thus saith the Lord GOD; Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain, that they may live. So I prophesied as he commanded me, and the breath came into them, and they lived, and stood up upon their feet, an exceeding great army" (Ez.37:7-10).

Charles H. Dyer says, "To what did this vision refer? God said it was about the nation of Israel (the whole house of Israel) that was then in captivity...the breath of life the corpses received symbolized the Holy Spirit, promised in Israel's New Covenant" (Charles H. Dyer, "Ezekiel" in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: Old Testament, ed. John F. Walvoord & Roy B. Zuck [Colorado Springs 1995 ], 1298).

The regeneration of the "nation" of Israel is a blessing under the New Diathēkē (covenant) promised to the "nation" of Israel. It is a "type" of the regeneration of the "individual" believer. Under Israel's New Diathēkē that nation will be regenerated by the Spirit and the word of God:

"As for me, this is my covenant with them, saith the LORD; My spirit that is upon thee, and my words which I have put in thy mouth, shall not depart out of thy mouth, nor out of the mouth of thy seed, nor out of the mouth of thy seed's seed, saith the LORD, from henceforth and for ever" (Isa.59:21).

Under the New Diathēkē (testament) which is in operation today the “individual” is regenerated by the Spirit: "Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life" (2 Cor.3:6; KJV).

Prior to salvation the sinner is described as being "dead" in sin: "And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses" (Col.2:13).

The believer is quickened or brought to life upon believing the gospel that comes in the power of the Holy Spirit: "For our gospel came not unto you in word only, but also in power, and in the Holy Spirit, and in much assurance" (1 Thess.1:5).

"Unto whom it was revealed, that not unto themselves, but unto us they did minister the things, which are now reported unto you by them that have preached the gospel unto you with the Holy Spirit sent down from heaven; which things the angels desire to look into" (1 Pet.1:12).

The Apostle Peter tells believers that they were "born again" by the gospel: "Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever...And this is the word which by the gospel is preached unto you" (1 Pet.1:23,25).

The regeneration of the "nation" of Israel is referred to as being "earthly" by the Lord Jesus and the regeneration of the "individual" is referred to as being "heavenly" (Jn.3:12).

In His grace,
Jerry

Jay's picture

Ed Vasicek wrote:
There are actually two "bone" illustrations; one is of bones scattered, the other of graves opening. Although the primary teaching is that God will revive Israel, there might be a double-meaning. I say "might," so I am not saying this is certain. At bare minimum, Jesus is alluding to the same imagery.

Ed-

Interesting - I've never heard these two passages connected together before. I'll look at it some more, but I'm not as convinced that Jesus is alluding to the Ezekiel passage as you are. To me, the emphasis of this passage [the John one ] is that Jesus is God. I think that if Jesus were referring to Ezekiel, then he would not refer to the 'tombs' [v. 28 ], but rather the bones.

Jerry, I'm assuming that you're a Covenant theologian, based on what you wrote. Is that correct?

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Jay's picture

I just realized that I wasn't paying attention to the latter part of the Ezekiel passage...too focused on v. 1-10, so please disregard that post. Sorry 'bout that!

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Jerry Shugart's picture

Jay C wrote:
Jerry, I'm assuming that you're a Covenant theologian, based on what you wrote. Is that correct?

Hi Jay C,

No, I am not a Covenant theologian. I am what is commonly called a Mid Acts Dispensationalist.

In His grace,
Jerry