A Vow Regarding the KJV

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Bert Perry's picture

In my former church, I noted that the Bibles provided for the youth group were kJVs in an 8 point font....suffice it to say that I made a point of finding some spare NIVs (1984 of course) in a more reasonable 10/11 point font that the kids could actually read.  For these kids, reading at all was a challenge, and trying to read in Elizabethan/Jacobean English just made it even more difficult.  

They were, sad to say, a great example of kids who had been in churches for 15 years or more who had never had much discipleship to speak of.  Pretty darned sad, and the blame is a target rich environment, sad to say.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

TylerR's picture

Editor

I have finally decided, once and for all, to switch from the KJV to the NET. Several years ago, I began regularly consulting other translations when I found myself puzzled over what the phrase "openeth the matrix of her womb" meant. Now, I'm at the point where I'm ready to simply switch once and for all. Add to that, I'm at a church where folks primarily use the NASB and have no KJV heritage at all. They look extremely puzzled when I read aloud or speak and quote in KJV English.

The main obstacle which had been stopping me from switching is that my entire memory bank in in the KJV. I have trouble locating key words in passages from different versions, because I'm automatically homing in on the verse as I know it from the KJV.

I have decided, however, that the time has come. I'm ordering a full notes version of the NET in a few weeks and switching once and for all.

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

JohnBrian's picture

TylerR wrote:

my entire memory bank in in the KJV. I have trouble locating key words in passages from different versions, because I'm automatically homing in on the verse as I know it from the KJV.

Whenever I use Bible Gateway to search for a phrase I ALWAYS use the KJV, because that is my memory bank as well. My preaching Bible is a Thompson Chain NKJV, given to me by a family in a church where I served as an interim pastor. I had mentioned when preaching from my TC KJV how much I wanted a NKJV and some weeks later there was a Bible on the pew where I sat. It was an anonymous gift from the "church" but was not hard to figure out who had placed it there. I asked the wife to inscribe it as a gift from the church.

I use the ESV on my phone for my not-so-daily Bible reading through the YouVersion app.

CanJAmerican - my blog
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T Howard's picture

TylerR wrote:

The main obstacle which had been stopping me from switching is that my entire memory bank in in the KJV. I have trouble locating key words in passages from different versions, because I'm automatically homing in on the verse as I know it from the KJV.

Same here. Although I've found that it delights our congregation when I quote a verse from memory and comment that it's from the KJV because that's how I memorized it as a kid.

Dean Taylor's picture

Mark's use of this word strikes a chord with me. The conviction that people must have the Word in their spoken language motivated our church's transition to current English translations several years ago. Here's the statement we used:

"Many believers continue to be blessed in reading and studying from the cherished and majestic text of the King James Version of the Bible.  There is also great blessing to be received from translations that present an accurate and literal rendering of the original languages using the vocabulary and form most readily understood by the people of 21st century America.   There is a growing number of believers who can better access the meaning and message of God’s Word through a more vernacular translation.  In addition, the population we are commissioned to evangelize is becoming progressively less familiar with the literary style and archaic language of Elizabethan English.  People without Christ must have the opportunity to receive the Word in their spoken language." 

              DeanHTaylor.com 

pvawter's picture

I read this today in Frank Gaebelein's "Four Minor Prophets" referring to Habakkuk 2:7 on page 172:

"As to the last clause of verse 7, the modern reader would understand it better were "spoils" to be substituted for "booties." Some years ago the writer was teaching Habakkuk in an adult Bible class. Following a lesson in which this chapter was discussed, a woman physician attending the class asked why the prophet mentioned little shoes ("booties"). It took only a minute to point out that Habakkuk was not speaking of infant footwear, but that the seventeenth century translators were simply using the plural of booty, a plural that has an intensive force. The incident reminds us of the necessity for verifying the meaning of Bible words. However much we value the Bible as the inspired Word of God, we must use common sense in interpreting it."