After Mass Shooting, Florida Votes to Put “in God We Trust” Signs in Schools

"It appears that lawmakers in Florida have found out a way to prevent increased gun violence. Instead of imposing a comprehensive ban on assault weapon purchases, which they rejected, the elected representatives of the state have voted to put the sentence 'In God We Trust' within the confines of every classroom." WRN

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John E.'s picture

I "like" how the writer completely glossed over the fact that Rep. Daniels acknowledged that there are complicated issues that still need to be resolved. This makes the line "It's hard for any rational person to justify the passing of the HB 839 bill" revealing. 

Two things can be true at once. As Rep. Daniels said, it's ultimately a heart issue. But as Rep. Daniels also said, "Florida has multiple 'gun issues' which must be solved." The writer has fallen into the false dichotomy trap.

David R. Brumbelow's picture

The Brazoria County, Texas Sheriff’s Department now puts “In God We Trust” on the back of their vehicles.  Brazoria County is just south of Houston.  

David R. Brumbelow

GregH's picture

While lunacy overreactions abound on the left, I think the "In God We Trust" reaction from the right is every bit as stupid. Probably more so in fact.

Today's typical evangelical can't seem to understand the rather obvious problem that if you bring Christian slogans into the classroom, you have to either allow Muslim slogans too or rewrite the Constitution.

Or I guess a third option is to believe the inane rhetoric of someone like Roy Moore who suggests that while the Constitutional right of religious freedom may apply to all religions, it applies to one (Christianity) more than others. 

David R. Brumbelow's picture

“In God We Trust”

National Motto adopted by United States Congress on July 30, AD 1956. 

It has also long been used on USA currency.  

Some see it as showing the Judeo-Christian heritage we have in the USA.  

David R. Brumbelow

John E.'s picture

Do you believe that sinners ceasing their rebellion and trusting in God will make the problem of gun violence better or worse?

GregH's picture

John E. wrote:

Do you believe that sinners ceasing their rebellion and trusting in God will make the problem of gun violence better or worse?

John, that has nothing to do with my point. My point is that bringing that slogan into schools will do nothing to stop gun violence. It is just a way to make evangelicals feel better about things.

John E.'s picture

"It is just a way to make evangelicals feel better about things."

I must admit that I am at a decided disadvantage in this conversation with you, Greg, having never been able to figure how to divine people's motives without them telling me. 

GregH's picture

John E. wrote:

"It is just a way to make evangelicals feel better about things."

I must admit that I am at a decided disadvantage in this conversation with you, Greg, having never been able to figure how to divine people's motives without them telling me. 

No worries. There is no rule that you have to converse. 

Bert Perry's picture

I hope this doesn't cause Greg to reconsider his point, but I am in at least partial agreement with him.  (just kidding, Greg)  One minor correction is that with a 97-10 vote, the Democrats don't escape culpability for this, either.  It is a bipartisan bit of lunacy.

Seriously, when I saw this headline, I thought that it must have been the Babylon Bee, perhaps with an argument that since kids are using credit cards instead of cash, that they need to have it on the wall of their classroom so they can be reminded of this "vital evangelistic resource."  

And let's be real here.  We have a country where 40% of kids are born out of wedlock, where we have tens of trillions of dollars in debt, and where a million children are being murdered in the womb each year...."In God We Trust" sounds like a cruel mockery in that light, really.  Is it perhaps a good evangelistic tool?  If we think so, take a look at John's post from today.  The ugly reality is that "bandwagon evangelism" generates mostly false converts. 

Don't get me wrong.  Where Christians have gotten it right in our country, and all of us have benefited, yes, that certainly belongs in history curriculum, right along with both Washington's memberships in the church and the Masons.  I just am no fan of bandwagon sloganeering, and this seems to qualify.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Ron Bean's picture

Banners, posters, ribbons, tee shirts, and signs..................

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

John E.'s picture

It may very well be bandwagon sloganeering, but according to the article, at least some of the lawmakers connected to the bill recognize that other actions need to be taken, too. I guess I'm wondering why we're so quick to distance ourselves from declarations that point people to their need to submit to God. 

You referenced my article, and I'm pretty sure you agree with me on this - I am a huge fan of and incredibly thankful for the frequency with which the gospel was proclaimed to me. In the main, the problems were twofold: 1. my rebellious heart. 2. The culture that practically made it against the rules to not be a Christian.

There's no way that I want Christian schools and parents to preach the gospel less because of those two problems. In light of the "In God We Trust" article above, we can be "fans" of the declaration while still being mindful of (and pointing out) the abuses and misuses of it. In other words, I don't think the answer is being less vocal about the need for all humans to submit to the Sovereign Creator of the Universe.  

Bert Perry's picture

No argument with that, John.  More or less, I'd summarize the bill as...a "soft" way of making it more difficult not to pose as a Christian, to paraphrase your words a touch.  Be vocal about our need?  You bet.  I would simply say that "In God We Trust" comes pretty close to assuming that need is met, and that's dangerous.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

John E.'s picture

I agree with you, Bert. And I don't believe that you were doing this, but I've becoming increasingly curious about certain segments of conservative Christianity's seeming need to distance themselves from any cultural expressions of our faith. It often feels like some Christians are embarrassed to say that the only real solution for gun violence (and all sin) is the gospel of Jesus Christ (once again, I don't think that's what you were saying). 

GregH's picture

It is not about being distancing from cultural expressions of Christianity. It is acknowledging that much of what fits in that category is beyond shallow, often embarrassing and sometimes hypocritical. This fits mostly into the first category. It accomplishes nothing of substance but Christians can pat themselves on the back that they "got God back in schools." 

That is before the little problem of no discrimination against any religion in government and the fact that if you bring Christianity into schools, you have to allow other religions as well. Few Christians acknowledge that little problem much less wrestle with it. I have become more and more convinced that most evangelicals want to have their cake and eat it too. They want freedom of religion but only if it is their religion.