Blogroll

Welcome to the SharperIron Blogroll.

The Blogroll is a collection of blogs that are often of interest and help to SI readers. SharperIron does not create the content of these blogs and the views expressed in them are those of their respective writers.

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DBTS Blog
(about)

  • Kyle Dunham - Mon, 02/24/2020 - 7:53am
    Recently Dr. Kyle Dunham, Associate Professor of Old Testament at DBTS, published an article in the Bulletin for Biblical Research on the literary structure and theology of Proverbs. The article was entitled “Structure and Theology in Proverbs: Its Function as an Educational Program for Novice Leaders in Ancient Israel,” and appeared in the November 2019 edition... Read More
  • Mark Snoeberger - Tue, 02/18/2020 - 1:53pm
    Singing has evolved dramatically throughout Church history. And like many other cultural phenomena, it is evolving more quickly today. This gives our generation a unique opportunity to study that evolution as it happens. I’m not writing today about organs and pianos vs. guitars and drums (though the evolving circumstances of worship are surely not shrug-worthy);... Read More
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Religious Affections (about)

  • Becky Aniol - Wed, 04/01/2020 - 8:45am
    Some of my favorite Christian homeschool video curricula is on sale this week. I recommend Visual Latin (approximately 6th grade and up), Grammar of Poetry (junior high and up), and Old Western Culture (high school). I pay attention to sale prices, and this is the lowest price of the year on Visual Latin, so snatch […]
  • Scott Aniol - Wed, 04/01/2020 - 7:00am
    This past Monday I turned 40, and because of “stay in place” requirements, my wife hosted a surprise Zoom birthday celebration. About 20 people logged on, they sang “Happy birthday” (which didn’t go well, but was hilarious), and it was a really nice brief chance to see a lot of friends and family since we […]
  • David de Bruyn - Tue, 03/31/2020 - 7:00am
    When Israel lost its Temple in A. D. 70, you might imagine it would have prompted much soul-searching and repentance among the rabbis that had rejected Jesus as Messiah. In fact, the rabbis had known for forty years before that date that something was amiss. Yoma 39b of the Talmud records the strange occurrences from […]
  • David Huffstutler - Mon, 03/30/2020 - 7:00am
    This is more or less a transcript from a Facebook Live video that I provided to my church yesterday morning. I hope you find it to be an encouragement during trying times. Bold formatting indicates main points and Scriptural quotations from the ESV. — Imagine being pressed from all sides in life, find yourself in […]
  • Jeff Straub - Fri, 03/27/2020 - 1:46pm
    Jeff Straub The ministry of the Word is the primary duty of the pastor. Both Paul’s exhortation to Timothy in 1 Timothy 4 and his personal example (e.g. Acts 17:23) make that abundantly clear. Preaching the Word is a high and holy calling. Ministers have often talked about standing behind the “sacred desk.” The desk […]
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Thoughts on Theology (about)

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Stuff Out Loud
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Institute for Nouthetic Studies Blog (about)

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Institute of Biblical Leadership(about)

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ChurchWorksMedia Blog (about)

  • Chris Anderson - Thu, 02/20/2020 - 2:50pm

    So far, Church Works Media has published over 50 hymns and songs. Some are more familiar, some less. One of my favorites is still kind of unknown: “God Has Spoken.” Scripture describes several ways in which God has revealed Himself to humanity. This hymn highlights 3 of them, noting the crescendo from general revelation to special […]

    The post God Has Spoken appeared first on Church Works Media.

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Strength for Today (about)

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By Faith We Understand (about)

  • Mark Ward - Mon, 03/09/2020 - 4:27pm

    In one week I’ll be “speaking” “at” a “conference” on the future of the Bible that is all online—actually, I recorded the video today and am now uploading it. My talk was really fun to put together, and I gave it this title: “Anything Invented After You’re Thirty-Five Is against the Natural Order of Things: A Media Ecology of Bible Software.”

    In my talk I try to show a via media between techno-utopianism and the doomsday views of Ned Ludd.

    You can sign up to view my talk at this link.

  • Mark Ward - Mon, 03/09/2020 - 3:41pm

    The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson

    My rating: 5 of 5 stars

    Somehow some writers of biography end up sounding trite, both in their relating of their subjects’ stories and in the lessons they draw from them.

    Isaacson is not one of these writers. The word that comes to my mind to describe him is “complementarity.” His powers of anecdote selection complement his keen ability to distill insight from them. I thoroughly enjoyed his Steve Jobs biography and felt that the set of biographies in Innovators—bios of people and of the technologies they created—complements the Jobs bio very well. Innovators expands the vision of the power of humanity and technology working together, humanities and science, to include the many stories beyond Jobs’ that demonstrate this power. Innovation comes from collaboration, from the complementarity of visionary and...

  • Mark Ward - Thu, 03/05/2020 - 12:16pm

    From the difficult-to-watch documentary (available on Netflix), One Child Nation. So profoundly sad and sobering.

    For when Gentiles, who do not have the law, by nature do what the law requires, they are a law to themselves, even though they do not have the law. They show that the work of the law is written on their hearts, while their conscience also bears witness, and their conflicting thoughts accuse or even excuse them

    (Romans 2:14–15 ESV)
  • Mark Ward - Wed, 02/19/2020 - 1:55am

    I’ve become a counselor for a number of young men who have realized that they can no longer in good conscience remain tied to King James Only institutions. Almost without exception, the ones who have reached out to me have shown genuine graciousness and gratitude toward the pastors and teachers in that world who shaped them. It’s really been remarkable to me how few chips on shoulders I have witnessed. I praise God. I always, always urge them to be as gracious as possible, considering themselves lest they also be tempted. Just yesterday I urged one of them not to go public with a complaint he was making about KJV Onlyism—it wasn’t seasoned with grace, just salt. He humbly listened and agreed.

    One recurring fear among these men is that they don’t know where they will end up. The King James Version was, in their world and in their hearts, like a concrete wall along the Rio Grande built by Jack Hyles between the United States and full-on theological liberalism. Knock it down and who knows how many theological illegals will make it into the church, or how many Christians will pitch their tents toward Sodom? The KJV was a symbol of all the...

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Emeth Aletheia

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