Pope Francis says Donald Trump is 'not a Christian' | Reactions

Took me a few minutes, but I get it.

So first I had to do a https://www.tineye.com/ search to confirm that the Vatican-ish looking photo was indeed part of the Vatican: the entrance to the Vatican Museums, and part of the "wall" between Italy and Vatican City.

So putting it together with the article...the pope doesn't like Trump's idea of a wall, and yet the Vatican has a wall between it and the rest of Italy. I get it now. And now I've probably spoiled Jim's riddle, but saved everyone else some time. Smile

And then Jim has to go and post Falwell's comments, and I'm left praying, "Even so, come quickly, Lord Jesus."

Michael Osborne
Philadelphia, PA

Wrong on walls, right on Trump's faith

Yes, the Vatican has walls, and if it denies faith to build walls, we also must blame some of the great kings of Israel, not to mention Nehemiah.  Nations have a right to choose who visits, and under what conditions.

But since Trump can't point to any sins for which he is repentant, I've got to say the Pope is right, and Falwell and Graham are wrong, about his faith.  He attends a Presbyterian church from time to time, but his own testimony denies the Gospel.  Hence he is not a Christian.

Educating Our Children

I wonder about the quality of education and discernment from the President of a Christian university who says that someone is a Christian who shows no evidence of being a Christian. What else is going on at that school?

Wally Morris

Charity Baptist Church

Huntington, IN

amomentofcharity.blogspot.com

Trump's own words

By Trump's own testimony, he says he does NOT need forgiveness, which would keep him well outside the bounds of about every branch of Christianity out there. Of course the fact that he would own strip clubs also sheds some light on where his heart is.

Lost in translation

I do agree that the Pope should keep his Catholic nose out of our politics, although we indeed are prone to stick our noses in his politics.  But in his defense, the problem of what he says and how it was interpreted may be a translation problem.  If his actual words said that anyone who builds walls and not bridges is not "a" Christian, then Christian is a noun and qualifies the faith identity of the person refered to.  If, however, he said, "anyone who builds walls and not bridges is not Christian (without the "a"), then Christian was used as an adjective, meaning that it is not very Christian to build walls and not build bridges.  Get it?  I am one who supports wall-building to control illegal immigration, but I don't want to let this become a political issue, even though Donald Trump saw advantage in stirring up the media to help solidify his support in South Carolina.  It was probably a  non-issue.

It's rhetoric

like Pope Francis' that gave rise to anti-Catholicism.

Hoping to shed more light than heat..


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