GARBC 2006

In The Nick of TimeThe General Association of Regular Baptist Churches has been in a controversy about Cedarville University ever since the school accepted endorsement by the State Convention of Baptists in Ohio. This endorsement provided Cedarville with a formal link to Southern Baptist circles that paralleled its relationship of approval and partnering in Regular Baptist circles. Though both Regular Baptists and Southern Baptists are formally committed to the fundamentals of the faith, they are different in important ways. One difference is their attitude toward church leaders who deny the fundamentals. The GARBC has not been willing to tolerate churches that deny fundamentals of the faith. It has not even been willing to tolerate churches that tolerate others who deny fundamentals. It has separated from apostates and from those who were willing to fellowship with them.
The Southern Baptist Convention has a more ambivalent attitude. Though Southern Baptist conservatives have controlled the presidency and thereby shifted the operational control of Convention agencies into the hands of conservatives, they have made no recognizable attempt to expunge apostates from the denomination. Liberal professors and ecclesiastics simply regrouped under the shelter of state conventions or ad‐hoc organizations while remaining within the Southern Baptist fold.
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Praying in Jesus' Name

NOTE: This article appears in the July/August 2006 issue of Frontline Magazine. It appears here with permission of the publisher.

By David Pennington

Alarmingly, Bible-believing Christians in the United States of America are being denied their God-given and constitutional rights. A clear example is that clergy or designated individuals who open the Indiana House of Representatives in prayer have been forbidden to pray in Jesus’ name (see December 1, 2005, edition of the Indianapolis Star). Surprisingly, this prohibition was upheld by Judge David Hamilton who required “any person chosen to give the invocation be instructed it must not advance any one faith or be used in bid to convert listeners.” Judge Hamilton’s ruling included the prohibition of invokers praying in Jesus’ name.
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A Sovereign Mandate

NOTE: This article appears in the July/August 2006 issue of Frontline Magazine. It appears here with permission of the publisher.

By Tavis J. Long

Believing that the privilege to pray in Jesus’ name is fundamental to the Christian’s relationship with Christ, and understanding that the privilege to reference the personage of Jesus in public prayer is under increasing attack in the military chaplaincy, we resolve that our Chaplains will be supported, defended, and encouraged to pray in the name of Jesus as mandated by the Scriptures. The practice is not done as a means to ostracize or exclude Americans of other religions; however, we believe that Christian chaplains are privileged to pray in Jesus’ name, not just as a right guaranteed by human governments, but because the Scriptures mandate all Christians to offer petitions in Christ’s stead. Therefore, as an endorsing agency, the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship will expect and prepare its chaplains to practice this God-ordained commandment of invoking Jesus’ name in such a way that glorifies God and edifies fellow Christians.

Here’s a theological question. Do we worship God because the Constitution permits us to or do we worship God because of Biblical mandate? It is a simple question with a very simple answer—our worship is mandated by God, and it is only protected, not granted, by the Constitution.
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Concerning Praying in Jesus' Name: FBFI Resolution 06-05

FBFI 2006 Annual ConferenceNOTE: The following standing resolution was presented at the 86th Annual Fellowship of the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship International on June 13, 2006, at Hamilton Square Baptist Church in San Francisco, California.

Be it resolved that the membership of FBFI calls upon all genuine Bible-believing Christians, including its chaplaincy, to exercise daily their God-given and constitutional rights to pray public and private prayers in the name of Jesus Christ.

Global Warming

NOTE: This article appears in the July/August 2006 issue of Frontline Magazine. It appears here with permission of the publisher.

By Mark Bouslog and Kevin Schaal

In early February of 2006, eighty-six prominent evangelical leaders, including Rick Warren, inaugurated the “Evangelical Climate Initiative,” seeking legislation on global warming. The initiative immediately sparked a reaction from politically active evangelicals such as Charles Colson and James Dobson, declaring that “global warming is not a consensus issue.”(1) Since that time the floodgates of discussion have opened from the broader evangelical movement concerning an evangelical approach to environmental issues. Because issues of environment have now been forced into the religious and theological arena, it is appropriate for Fundamentalists to address them. Read more about Global Warming

Concerning Global Warming and the Environment: FBFI Resolution 06-04

FBFI 2006 Annual ConferenceNOTE: The following standing resolution was presented at the 86th Annual Fellowship of the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship International on June 13, 2006, at Hamilton Square Baptist Church in San Francisco, California.

Fundamentalists have always believed that we must apply the principles of Scripture to all areas of life. This would include applying Biblical principles to the stewardship of the planet on which dwell. We urge all Fundamentalists to teach and model clear Biblical ethics that include: Read more about Concerning Global Warming and the Environment: FBFI Resolution 06-04

Concerning the Integrated Church Movement: FBFI Resolution 06-03

FBFI 2006 Annual ConferenceNOTE: The following standing resolution was presented at the 86th Annual Fellowship of the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship International on June 13, 2006, at Hamilton Square Baptist Church in San Francisco, California.

While recognizing that the family is under attack in our nation and in many churches today, and recognizing that choice to have (or not have) age-graded ministries is the prerogative of individual local churches as God directs them, the FBFI denounces the doctrinally errant and schismatic teaching characteristic of the Integrated Church movement for the following reasons: Read more about Concerning the Integrated Church Movement: FBFI Resolution 06-03