Trust Amid Life's Travels

janz_walk_in_woods.jpgAuthor’s Note: For the past nine months, I have been consumed with the vision of planting a church in downtown Denver. This vision has called me and my family to a life of travel, a part-time job, and constant change. As the owner of SI, I have felt detached from the site I started almost three years ago. I appreciate the crew that has pinch-hit for me. For the next week, I’d like to update you on what God has been showing me over the past nine months. I will do so by publishing some articles that I wrote for our prayer partners.

Proverbs 3:5-6—”Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths” (KJV).
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Dependent on God Alone

janz_dependence.jpgAuthor’s Note: For the past nine months, I have been consumed with the vision of planting a church in downtown Denver. This vision has called me and my family to a life of travel, a part-time job, and constant change. As the owner of SI, I have felt detached from the site I started almost three years ago. I appreciate the crew that has pinch-hit for me. For the next week, I’d like to update you on what God has been showing me over the past nine months. I will do so by publishing some articles that I wrote for our prayer partners.
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Book Review: Gospel-Centered Hermeneutics

Goldsworthy, Graeme. Gospel-Centered Hermeneutics: Foundations and Principles of Evangelical Biblical Interpretation. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2007. Jacketed Hardcover, 341 pp. $29.00.

(Review copy courtesy of InterVarsity Press.)

Purchase: IVP | WTS | CBD | Amazon

Indices: Name and Scripture.

ISBNs: 0830828397 / 9780830828395

Table of Contents

Excerpts:
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Fundamentalists and Scholarship, Part 7

To Make a Scholar

In The Nick of Time
Read Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, and Part 6.

Suppose we fundamentalists wanted to produce scholars—real ones. In what sort of resources would we have to invest? What does it take to make a scholar?

The first bit of news here is good: there are certain activities in which we would not have to invest. For example, there is no reason for Fundamentalism to educate its own scholars in the sciences and humanities. If we equip church members to be serious Christians, then they will be able to integrate their faith into the scholarly training that they receive in any institution. The only scholars that Fundamentalism needs to produce are theological scholars.
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Three Essentials of Spiritual Development

A Meditation on 2 Corinthians 3:18

And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit (2 Cor. 3:18 ESV).
camera_smith.jpgAlthough electronic digital cameras with their instant results have exploded with popularity, perhaps you still remember or use a camera that requires actual film. These cameras cause an image to be captured as a negative on the film. The film is taken to a photo development lab, where equipment in a darkroom transfers the image from a negative to a positive print. While a digital camera allows you to see an image of the finished picture instantly, you actually have to wait (usually at least an hour) before seeing what the film captured.

Sometimes pictures do not turn out like we expected. A picture might show up completely black, or it may have several colors blurred beyond recognition. One should ask certain questions if a picture does not turn out as expected. The questions might include: Did I take the lens cap off? Did I give the camera sufficient exposure to the scene I tried to capture? What does the development actually show?
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Remembering Maggie Jackson

Repetition aids memory; meditation internalizes. That’s why the psalmist was confident that a steady diet of Scripture would keep him from sin (Ps. 119:11). Elderly people tend to get forgetful, and they also tend to lose certain inhibitions that once would have kept private thoughts from being advertised. Observe this phenomenon and take it to heart. Your river_osborne.jpgmother warned you not to make faces, lest your face would get stuck that way. And she was right. If you smile (or frown) a lot today, your octogenarian face will show it, like it or not.

Maggie Jackson made it well past the octogenarian stage. She was over ninety when we knew her—my wife and I, newlyweds, picking her up from her nursing home and bringing her to church so many Sunday mornings. She’d reminisce to us. Even though she was ninety plus, her repertoire was limited. She was getting a bit forgetful. So we listened to the same stories week after week. Her salvation as a young person; her attendance at Moody; her long and happy marriage to a pastor about twenty years her senior (he had died long ago). Whatever the story, the moral was the same: “God has been so good to me.” This statement from a lady with no family but the church, in poor health, recently moved into a nursing home.
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