Fundamentalists and Scholarship, Part 3

Hazards of Scholarship

In The Nick of Time
Read Part 1 and Part 2.

In the past two essays, I have tried to articulate how scholars understand their own craft. My guess is that many fundamentalists will think that I have defined scholarship too rigorously. To this I can only reply that I shall be embarrassed if real scholars stumble across these essays, because they will most likely think that I have not understood their work rigorously enough. What I have articulated is, I think, a fair if minimal description of how scholarship is perceived within the real world of the academy.

I now wish to ask a question that will move us toward the core of this series: Does fundamentalism need scholars? In order to answer this question, we need to make two assessments. First, we need to perceive the hazards of scholarship so that we can calculate what fundamentalism stands to lose by having scholars. Then we need to understand the benefits of scholarship so that we can estimate what fundamentalism stands to gain. In this essay I will mention three hazards or dangers that come along with scholarship.
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"The Discipline of Spiritual Discernment" Blog Tour

Tim ChalliesAuthor Tim Challies has embarked on a “blog tour” to promote the release of his new book, The Discipline of Spiritual Discernment. A blogger on the tour will pose a question about discernment, and Tim will address the question and the comments that readers might have.

The questions SI posed to Tim are as follows, accompanied by his responses.

Gift of discernment: “[Gene Apple, the lead pastor at Willow] said, ‘The primary spiritual gift that they look for in an elder is: the gift of discernment. … People with the gift of discernment have the uncanny ability to make the right call.” —Joe Z’s talk.

http://www.buildingchurchleaders.com/articles/2002/le-2002-001-11.80.html

See especially the last section: Promptings of the Holy Spirit.
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The Wrong Hero

You’ve read to the end of the story. You had high hopes for the protagonist, a realistically flawed hero; but instead of cutting a compelling figure at the end, his story concludes with more of a whimper than a bang. The plot has already stretched your credulity—was it a tragicomedy, an epic, a cautionary tale? You read it again, and again. Sometimes you Whalelaugh, sometimes you wince, and sometimes you spare grudging admiration for the guy. After all, he’s a bit like you, only more so.

One of the steps I’ve taken for my novel-in-progress is to create character bios. I fitted them out with names and traits and back stories. Below, I’ve sketched out some details about the prophet in a certain Old Testament book, as if he were a mere character:

Occupation: Prophet of Israel

Location: Israel

Age: Unknown

Appearance: Unknown

Family: Unknown
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Book Review: Showdown

Dekker, Ted. Showdown. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2006. Jacketed Hardcover, 384 pages. $22.99.

Purchase: Thomas Nelson | CBD | Amazon

ISBNs: 1595540059 / 9781595540058

Subjects: Christian Fiction, Suspense/Mystery
Chapter Excerpt

Ted Dekker is known for novels that combine adrenaline-laced stories with unexpected plot twists, unforgettable characters, and incredible confrontations between good and evil. Ted lives in Austin with his wife LeeAnn and their four children.
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The KJVO Debate in Light of “The Translators to the Reader,” Part 2

Author’s Note: I have provided page numbers for quotations using The Holy Bible: King James Version (1611 Edition. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers, n.d.). From the title page: “a word-for-word reprint of the First Edition of the Authorized Version presented in roman [sic] letters for easy reading and comparison with subsequent editions.” I have updated some words with modernized spelling and inserted my own explanatory notes in brackets, however.

See Part 1.

This is the final installment of a two-part article on the relevance of the KJV Preface for issues raised by some King James Version Only (KJVO) advocates. [1] The idea of an inspired or perfect Bible translation, the propriety of a translation in modern English, and the concerns about marginal notes were addressed in part 1. This article examines four more issues Bibleraised by KJVO proponents that are addressed in the KJV Preface, written by translator Miles Smith. [2]
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Fundamentalists and Scholarship, Part 2

What Is a Scholar?

In The Nick of Time
Read Part 1.

The idea of scholarship has narrowed over the centuries. During the later Middle Ages and the Renaissance, an ideal scholar would attempt to comprehend the entire body of human knowledge. As the corpus of knowledge expanded, however, the sciences and the humanities were gradually disengaged from one or the other, resulting in two sets of scholars. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, European universities (beginning with Berlin) were transformed into research institutions, and scholarship was increasingly viewed as advancement with a narrow specialization. This model was transplanted to North America, first at Johns Hopkins University and then in the schools connected with the American Association of Universities.

These shifts have resulted in two tensions surrounding the term “scholar.” First, some favor an older vision of scholarship that emphasizes broad learning, while others favor a definition focused more narrowly on advancing the frontiers of knowledge through specialized research and publishing. Second, the two halves of the academy tend to be suspicious of each other’s scholarship. Humanists sometimes dismiss scientists as mere technicians, while scientists sometimes write off the humanities as less than rigorous.
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The KJVO Debate in Light of “The Translators to the Reader,” Part 1

Author’s Note: I have provided page numbers for quotations using The Holy Bible: King James Version (1611 Edition. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers, n.d.). From the title page: “a word-for-word reprint of the First Edition of the Authorized Version presented in roman [sic] letters for easy reading and comparison with subsequent editions.” I have updated some words with modernized spelling and inserted my own explanatory notes in brackets, however.

Many of us have been exposed to or embroiled in debates relating to the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. Is it the only legitimate English translation? Should it be revised? Was it really good enough for Paul? The list goes on. The point of this article is to consider some issues raised by proponents of some form of the King James Version Only (KJVO) position 859675_book.jpgand how those issues were addressed by the translators of the KJV in their preface. [1] The listing below should not be taken as an accusation that all KJVO advocates hold to all of these ideas, but they are ideas that have been advanced by various advocates of a KJVO position.
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